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Troilus & Cressida

Production Team

 

Director.......................................................................................................................................Cait Redman

Assistant Director.................................................................................................Christopher Niesner

Stage Manager....................................................................................................................Abigail Olshin

Assistant Stage Manager...............................................................................Joan Raube-Wilson

Dramaturg..........................................................................................Molly Patrick Martinez-Collins

Costume Designers....................................................................J Paige Hilton & Petra Shearer

Pre-Production Dramaturgy......Devlin Ford, J Paige Hilton & Christopher Niesner

Music Director...........................................................................................................Mikaela Hanrahan

Set & Props..........................................................................................Devlin Ford & Ronan Melomo

Intimacy & Dance Choreographer......................................................................Matthias Bolon

Publicity and Marketing……………………………………………………………………………....Fawzia M. Istrabadi, 

  Mikaela Hanrahan, Shawn Passero, 

      Fallon Smyl, Johnny Williams III & 

        Sarah Scarborough

Special Thanks

Marie Lupia, Amy Wert, Tori Wright, Mili Koncelik, and

the American Shakespeare Center

 


Cast

 

Cressida, Aeneas, Calchas ...............................................................................................Devlin Ford

 

Ulysses, Hector, Cassandra ………………………..…………………………......................Mikaela Hanrahan

Troilus, Helen, Priam..........................................................................................................J. Paige Hilton

 

Achilles, Agamemnon, Diomedes ......................................................................Ronan Melomo

 

Patroclus, Nestor, Paris.....................................................................................Christopher Niesner

 

Pandarus, Thersites, Ajax..............................................................................................Petra Shearer




 

Director’s Note

 

“Their vow is made to ransack Troy, within whose strong 

immures the ravished Helen, Menelaus’ queen, with 

wanton Paris sleeps, and that’s the quarrel”

 

There is a saying, “all is fair in love and war.” But when you have been at war for seven years love becomes harder to hold onto and nothing is fair. Troilus and Cressida follows a war sprung from the love of Paris and Helen, a Trojan Prince and Grecian Queen. The Grecian Princes have come to Troy to bring Helen home; they are not succeeding. Ulysses, a Greek Prince, blames the lack of Grecian victory on Achilles and Patroclus, who are sitting out of the fight. Meanwhile, Troilus – a Trojan Prince - is in love with Cressida and uses 

Pandarus, her uncle, as a go-between for their relationship. The messiness of war follows and revolves around the three couples: Paris and Helen, Achilles and Patroclus, and Troilus and Cressida as they navigate their relationships with each other and their roles within society. 

Troilus and Cressida exists within a world of epic scale. Shakespeare opens his experimental work in the middle of the Trojan War with little context. The Homeric world is not the only grand culture at play within Troilus and Cressida. Shakespeare’s work is also inspired by Chaucer's epic poem Troilus and Criseyde. This clash of Greek and Trojan war and Chaucer's courtly love is what we have sought to capture with only six actors. How do you make the epic world small, yet still grand in its own right? This is the question we sought to answer within our rehearsal process. This notion of grandness is not something everyone is welcomed into. Both Troy and the Grecian camp function under the cultural expectations of what it is to “be a man.” We follow Troilus, Hector, and Achilles as they navigate expectations of “manhood”, while Cressida, Cassandra, Helen, and Andromache all attempt to survive in a society that has no place for them. 

 

Troilus and Cressida forces us to see the ugly parts of humanity: the parts that are war torn, power-hungry, and without compassion. It also focuses on relationships as something to cling to until it is impossible to hold on any longer. Troilus and Cressida is called an experimental play. At the end of this textual experiment I find myself asking “what does it cost to live in an epic world with standards as high as the walls of Troy?” For the characters in Troilus and Cressida, it costs everything. 

 

-Cait Redman and Christopher Niesner

 

Dramaturgy Note

 

Troilus and Cressida is a beautiful, wild, and dizzying play about love in the middle of a very long war. In her  concept statement, Cait Redman mentioned “Troilus and Cressida has an epic quality to it without being an epic itself.” I couldn't agree more. 

 

Although this play has many themes similar to an epic like honor, legacy, death, and victory, this play is not an epic. It's about lovers and soldiers trying to navigate their world in a brutal and senseless war. We hope that through this piece you are able to take away what resonates with you.


-Molly Patrick Martinez-Collins

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